New Home Care Policies Passed By Senate

Home care policies recently passed by the U.S. Senate are intended to help families support aging loved ones at home, instead of having to move to an institutional setting. S.1028 – The RAISE Family Caregivers Act The RAISE Family Caregivers Act seeks to accomplish three goals: Require that a national strategy be developed by Congress to implement recommendations from the federal Commission on Long-Term Care to support family caregivers Establish an advisory board that joins agencies from the government and private/public sectors to make recommendations and provide advice Identify ways that family caregivers can be supported and recognized by their communities, the government, health care providers and employers S.870 – The CHRONIC Care Act The CHRONIC Care Act seeks to improve

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Why Affordable Home Care Matters

Affordable home care matters. A recent study by the National Alliance for Caregiving and the AARP outlined the need for caregivers. If you find yourself struggling with the financial and health elements of caring for a loved one at home, you’re not alone. The researchers found that in years to come, the number of those requiring care will grow, but the population of those who can provide care will shrink. People will need to look outside of their network of close relatives and friends for a caregiver. Here are some other discoveries they made about caregiving: Nearly 1 in 10  caregivers is 75 or older. 40% of caregivers indicated a high burden of care. Half of respondents indicated they had no choice

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Help for Dementia Caregivers

A recent study by The National Alliance of Caregiving outlined the special circumstances experienced by caregivers of a loved one with dementia. Here are some of the statistics about dementia caregivers: 58% of dementia caregivers are women. On average, dementia caregivers are about 6 years older than non-dementia caregivers. The person receiving care is normally significantly older than other individuals who require a caregiver. 40% of dementia care recipients do not live in their own home and 16% are in some form of care facility. Dementia caregivers have more responsibility and have to provide assistance with a wider range of activities. On average, dementia caregivers spend more time providing care than those providing non-dementia care. 67% of dementia caregivers perform medical or nursing

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Home Care as Preventative Care

When it comes to the health of your senior loved one, it’s important to be proactive. With this approach, home care can be effective preventative health care. Home care can prevent injury and mitigate complications from chronic illnesses, major recoveries, or a sedentary lifestyle. This could improve long-term outcomes and reduce costly doctor visits. Here are a few examples of home care as preventative health care: Injury Prevention A home care worker can help your senior loved one avoid falls and other injury risks. These types of accidents can cause long term complications in the health of your senior loved one.  In seniors, injuries such as sprains or broken bones take much longer to heal and the effects are felt in

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Elder Abuse Myths and Facts

Letting someone come into your home and trusting them to take care of yourself or a loved one can understandably be scary. While quality caregivers provide reliable nonmedical homecare with compassion and professionalism, some individuals take advantage of older adults and their family members. This is a good reason to consider hiring from an accredited agency that vets its employees. Myth #1: Elder Abuse is Always Physical Violence There are many forms of abuse: physical, emotional/psychological, sexual, and financial. Neglect is a serious violation when it comes to senior care, since many adults require life-saving medications and/or assistance with daily tasks. Learn the warning signs and reach out to isolated seniors in your community. Myth #2: If An Adult Is Being

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What Caregivers Should Know About Senior Nutrition

Nutrition is a vital part of good health. For aging adults this is especially important, because great health helps you maintain an independent lifestyle and aids in the management of chronic illnesses. Here are 5 nutrition tips for seniors: 1. Nutritional needs change as you age. Eating a variety of foods can help make sure that nutritional needs are met. Look for foods that are low in salt and higher in fiber. A healthy meal should include protein, fruits and veggies, whole grains and low in fat dairy products. 2. In addition to knowing what makes a healthy meal, knowing how to read nutritional labels is very important and makes eating healthier much easier. Check labels for adverse contents. Items

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