Why Caregivers are Considered Patient Advocates

Whether you care for a loved one in their home, or manage their care from a distance, you have probably found yourself responsible for advocating for your loved one’s needs. Perhaps you’ve been on the phone with insurance companies on behalf of a loved one with dementia, or expressed concerns to your loved one’s care team about a sudden change in pain levels.  Home care workers are an important line of defense in many ways, including patient advocacy.  Managing Medications  Non-medical home care workers make sure patients take their prescription medications on time. They can also transport clients to and from medical appointments and pharmacies. They can help patients understand what each medication is for and how it is meant

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Cost Savings of Reducing Hospitalizations

Avoiding hospital visits saves patients, providers, and government aid programs a whole lot of money. More importantly, we shouldn’t lose sight of how avoiding hospitalization benefits the patient. No one wants to be transported to the emergency room if they can avoid it and stay at home instead, safe and healthy. What a Nursing Home Study Teaches Us About In-Home Care A recent study by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services found that a 17% drop in preventable hospitalizations led to $50 million in savings. During a four-year experiment, participating long-term care facilities were given training in order to treat certain conditions in their facility instead of transporting patients to the hospital. These results are possible because long-term care

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Prevent the Flu Among Aging Adults

The flu virus presents an annual risk to our population, especially among aging adults. Flu symptoms can quickly escalate into medical emergencies among those with compromised immune systems. This includes people with chronic illnesses, and it also includes aging adults whose bodies generally take longer to recover from illnesses. Flu Activity During 2017-2018 During the 2017-2018 flu season, the CDC has reported widespread flu activity across the United States. Here’s how nonmedical home care workers can help seniors avoid contracting the flu: Transportation to a doctor’s office, clinic, or pharmacy to receive the flu vaccine. Preparation of healthy meals to keep up immune system strength and ensure seniors are sufficiently hydrated. Checking in on seniors regularly and letting their care

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Senior Health During the Holidays

As Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s approach, there are things you can do to help your senior loved ones stay healthy and happy during the holidays. Dietary Needs It can be difficult, and indeed seems cruel, to prohibit a person from enjoying their favorite holiday foods. For those with strict diets, try alternative recipes that deliver flavor without breaking the diet. For those who wish to avoid overeating, plan ahead: if you expect to eat a big holiday dinner, eat a light lunch. Hydration and Drinking Alcohol Everyone needs sufficient hydration. Seniors need to drink a lot of water. Those who take medications usually need even more water intake to help their bodies process the drugs without getting dehydrated. Additionally,

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Understanding ADL and Long-Term Care Insurance

Activities of daily living, or ADL, are often used by Long Term Insurance providers as a way of gauging whether or not an individual qualifies to receive benefits. Activities of Daily Living typically include: Eating Bathing Dressing Using the Restroom Transferring and Mobility Continence Typically, to qualify for the benefits associated with Long Term Care insurance, an individual will need to have trouble with at least two activities of daily living. Keep in mind that every provider of Long Term Care Insurance may have a different list of ADLs that they use. You will need to look at your specific policy to determine these. When to Buy Long Term Care Insurance The business model of insurance requires that people who

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Why Families Need To Hire Caregivers On Their Own Terms

Caregiving can be complicated for families. More than one family member often needs some level of ongoing care, and these needs change over time as health improves or declines. Often, the decision to hire a caregiver is made by multiple family members, all with different desires, schedules, budgets and terms under which they are willing to hire a caregiver. Caregiving and health care form a complex web when families are involved. The more simple we as service providers can make it, the better for individuals and families. This is one reason why A-Z Best Home care offers an hourly rate and flexible scheduling. Our goal is to support the family caregivers as much as we support the recipient of home care services.

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