Senior Health During the Holidays

As Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Year’s approach, there are things you can do to help your senior loved ones stay healthy and happy during the holidays. Dietary Needs It can be difficult, and indeed seems cruel, to prohibit a person from enjoying their favorite holiday foods. For those with strict diets, try alternative recipes that deliver flavor without breaking the diet. For those who wish to avoid overeating, plan ahead: if you expect to eat a big holiday dinner, eat a light lunch. Hydration and Drinking Alcohol Everyone needs sufficient hydration. Seniors need to drink a lot of water. Those who take medications usually need even more water intake to help their bodies process the drugs without getting dehydrated. Additionally,

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Understanding ADL and Long-Term Care Insurance

Activities of daily living, or ADL, are often used by Long Term Insurance providers as a way of gauging whether or not an individual qualifies to receive benefits. Activities of Daily Living typically include: Eating Bathing Dressing Using the Restroom Transferring and Mobility Continence Typically, to qualify for the benefits associated with Long Term Care insurance, an individual will need to have trouble with at least two activities of daily living. Keep in mind that every provider of Long Term Care Insurance may have a different list of ADLs that they use. You will need to look at your specific policy to determine these. When to Buy Long Term Care Insurance The business model of insurance requires that people who

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Why Families Need To Hire Caregivers On Their Own Terms

Caregiving can be complicated for families. More than one family member often needs some level of ongoing care, and these needs change over time as health improves or declines. Often, the decision to hire a caregiver is made by multiple family members, all with different desires, schedules, budgets and terms under which they are willing to hire a caregiver. Caregiving and health care form a complex web when families are involved. The more simple we as service providers can make it, the better for individuals and families. This is one reason why A-Z Best Home care offers an hourly rate and flexible scheduling. Our goal is to support the family caregivers as much as we support the recipient of home care services.

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New Home Care Policies Passed By Senate

Home care policies recently passed by the U.S. Senate are intended to help families support aging loved ones at home, instead of having to move to an institutional setting. S.1028 – The RAISE Family Caregivers Act The RAISE Family Caregivers Act seeks to accomplish three goals: Require that a national strategy be developed by Congress to implement recommendations from the federal Commission on Long-Term Care to support family caregivers Establish an advisory board that joins agencies from the government and private/public sectors to make recommendations and provide advice Identify ways that family caregivers can be supported and recognized by their communities, the government, health care providers and employers S.870 – The CHRONIC Care Act The CHRONIC Care Act seeks to improve

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Why Affordable Home Care Matters

Affordable home care matters. A recent study by the National Alliance for Caregiving and the AARP outlined the need for caregivers. If you find yourself struggling with the financial and health elements of caring for a loved one at home, you’re not alone. The researchers found that in years to come, the number of those requiring care will grow, but the population of those who can provide care will shrink. People will need to look outside of their network of close relatives and friends for a caregiver. Here are some other discoveries they made about caregiving: Nearly 1 in 10  caregivers is 75 or older. 40% of caregivers indicated a high burden of care. Half of respondents indicated they had no choice

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Help for Dementia Caregivers

A recent study by The National Alliance of Caregiving outlined the special circumstances experienced by caregivers of a loved one with dementia. Here are some of the statistics about dementia caregivers: 58% of dementia caregivers are women. On average, dementia caregivers are about 6 years older than non-dementia caregivers. The person receiving care is normally significantly older than other individuals who require a caregiver. 40% of dementia care recipients do not live in their own home and 16% are in some form of care facility. Dementia caregivers have more responsibility and have to provide assistance with a wider range of activities. On average, dementia caregivers spend more time providing care than those providing non-dementia care. 67% of dementia caregivers perform medical or nursing

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